Importance of Doing Research When Choosing Your Outdoor Pool Design

Once you decide to get a pool, it may feel like your work is done. After all, you can simply call a pool company and let them take it from there, right? Well, not necessarily. Your pool designer can recommend a design that works for you, but they’ll probably have a few questions, and if you haven’t done your research, the pool guy or girl will seem to be talking a different language!
In the next few paragraphs, we’re going to talk about some of the terms your pool designer might throw your way. We’ll also tell you what to consider when making those choices. Let’s start with the colour. You probably assume that all pools are blue, and a lot of them are. But even then, there are different shades of blue.
For the most part, the colour of the pool is determined by the material used to make the floor and sides of the pool. It could be concrete, tile or mosaic, all with different tones, patterns, and styles. When your pool designer asks about colour, get them to show you the different textures available. They can even personalise the pool further by using coloured tiles to spell out the words of your favourite song.
For the most part, the colour of the pool is determined by the material used to make the floor and sides of the pool. It could be concrete, tile or mosaic, all with different tones, patterns, and styles. When your pool designer asks about colour, get them to show you the different textures available. They can even personalise the pool further by using coloured tiles to spell out the words of your favourite song.
Next, your designer might ask you if you want a baja shelf so you can read in the pool. No, he doesn’t mean you need a bookshelf inside the water. A baja shelf is an area of the shallow end where you can splash your feet, play with your toddlers, or put a lounge chair when you want to enjoy a good book. It’s usually a flat, level section and although it’s not essential, it makes a nice style icon.
Other style options include bubblers, which are simply tiny fountain bursts of water. Alternatively, install some waterfalls, or full-size fountains with coloured lights for extra effect. Perhaps you would prefer your pool to slope gently from dry surface to deep water. This is called a beach entrance and is great for small kids. It’s also helpful for elderly residents who might have knee problems and an aversion to stairs.
Have you seen a swimming pool that has a little slab of tile right in the middle of the water? These are called cocktail tables. And then there’s coping. It’s a fancy term for the edges of the pool, and you can design them in intricately detailed patterns if you want to. If you’d like sections of your pool that resemble mystic caverns, you could ask your pool maker to design a grotto for you.
If you happen to be a bit of a daredevil, you can design a pool that seems to slide right off the edge of a building, or fade into a mountainside. These are called infinity pools and are great if you live in a high altitude, you have a grand view, and you’re not particularly squeamish. Infinity pools are a great excuse for a home spa experience. Ask your designer to section off a part of the pool and install seats and hot-water jets. Now you can sit back, relax, and enjoy the glorious view.
Of course, if your pool is more an extension of your gym, think about its shape. Explain to your designer that you will primarily use the pool for laps. In that case, a simple elongated stretch is better than artsy abstract pool shapes.
And if you’d like your pool to have a more organic feel, you can choose a more natural design. Your pool can be built to look like a pond or lake, complete with reeds, a pier, and subtle unseen coping. Take an extra step and use salt to sterilise the water. It’s becoming a popular alternative to chlorine, though salt water pools require a specific maintenance regime, so look into that before you make your decision.
Your pool designer will probably have many more things to discuss with you, but we hope you’re now a lot less green when it comes to blue poolside matters.

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